China’s top political advisory body concludes annual session

China’s top political advisory body concludes annual session

  The closing meeting of the second session of the 13th National Committee of the Chinese People’s Political Consul

tative Conference (CPPCC) is held at the Great Hall of the People in Beijing, March 13, 2019.

  BEIJING — The Second Session of the 13th National Committee of the Chinese People’s Political Consultative Conf

erence (CPPCC), the top political advisory body, held its closing meeting Wednesday morning.

  Xi Jinping and other Chinese leaders attended the closing meeting at the Great Hall of the People in Beijing.

  Political advisors will vote on a draft resolution on the work report of the Standing Committee of the CPPCC Natio

nal Committee, a draft report on the examination of proposals, and a draft political resolution.

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Trump-Kim summit shows need for more talks

Trump-Kim summit shows need for more talks

United States President Donald Trump and Democratic People’s Republic of Korea top leader K

im Jongun did not sign any deal at their second summit in Hanoi on Thursday. So what will US-DPRK r

elations be like in the future? Two experts share their views with China Daily’s Pan Yixuan. Excerpts follow:

Both sides should show patience to continue talks

That no agreements were signed between the US and the DPRK in Hanoi came as a surprise since ex

pectations were high that the second Trump-Kim summit would yield at least a US-DPRK peace trea

ty, if not a pact on verifying the DPRK’s dismantled nuclear facilities or establishing a US liaison office in Py

ongyang, or an agreement on Washington partly lifting sanctions against Pyongyang.

In fact, the US tried to lower the expectations before the sum

mit by calling for long-term negotiations. It was confirmed at the post-summit news confe

rence of Trump that the sticking point between the two sides is Washington’s refusal to accept Py

ongyang’s demand to lift the sanctions in one fell swoop, and Pyongyang’s rejection of Washington’s proposal that it shoul

d do something “meaningful” to denuclearize the Korean Peninsula before getting any sanctions relief.

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Without mutual trust, neither the US will accept the

Without mutual trust, neither the US will accept the

demand for lifting the sanctions at one go, nor will Pyongyang dismantle all its nuclear facilit

ies and destroy its nuclear weapons in compliance with Washington’s demand.

Perhaps this lack of mutual trust prevented Kim and Trump from signing any agreem

ents at their second summit. Or maybe they didn’t sign any agreements because the two sides had not m

ade good preparations to reach consensuses on even very important issues.

With no agreements planned in advance, all the problems were left for the two leaders to dis

cuss and decide. And even if the two leaders have formed a good personal friendship, as Trump claimed, th

ey cannot be expected to compromise their countries’ positions on complicated historical issues.

Yet the second summit cannot be regarded as a failure, especia

lly because the Trump administration has left room for further talks with Pyongyang.

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No deal is better than a bad deal,” said Duyeon Kim, a Kor

No deal is better than a bad deal,” said Duyeon Kim, a Kor

  ea expert at Center for a New American Security. “Lifting key economic sanctio

ns without proportionate denuclearization steps risk losing leverage.”

  And even though the odds of success were low, with a mere

month for the US team to prepare, many Republicans portrayed the draw as a victory.

  ”It’s better to walk away than sign a bad deal,” said Sen. Lindse

y Graham, a South Carolina Republican and fierce critic of the Kim regime.

  ”What he did in Hanoi was the right thing to do — he walked away from a bad deal,” former Republican Sen. Rick Sant

orum told CNN’s “New Day,” adding that this was “a wonderful moment in (Trump’s) presidency.”

  Robert Galluci, a former US negotiator with North Kore

a, said he thought “the outcome was, potentially, perfe

ct … because things I worried about didn’t happen and things I wanted to happen, did happen.”

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The three higher-end models reverse Samsung’s unpopul

The three higher-end models reverse Samsung’s unpopul

  decision to put the fingerprint scanner on the back of the device. Now built into the disp

lay itself, the “ultrasonic fingerprint reader” compliments its Face Unlock feature but prom

ises more security. It doesn’t just take pictures of your fingerprint; the company says it uses machine-learning-bas

ed algorithm to read 3D fingerprints through ultrasonic sound waves.(Fingerprint data is stored only on the dev

ice itself, according to Samsung). The S10e features a capacitive fingerprint sensor on the side of the phone instead.

  Not surprisingly, Samsung is upping its camera game. The winner for the most cameras goes to the Gala

xy S10 5G, which offers a total of six, including a dual-front camera with a 3D-depth lens to handle th

ings like augmented reality. It has a quadruple rear camera with a wide, telephoto and (another) 3D depth lens.

  The S10 and S10+ feature nearly the same without the 3D depth len

s on the back. However, the S10e has single front- and dual rear-cameras in wide and ultra-wide lens.

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