Jobs and Sculley asked for other ideas, but the agency folks pushed

Jobs and Sculley asked for other ideas, but the agency folks pushed

Jobs and Sculley asked for other ideas, but the agency folks pushed back. “You guys didn’t want to run

‘1984’ last year,” one of them said. According to Sculley, Lee Clow added, “I will put my whole reputation,

everything, on this commercial.” When the filmed version, done by Ridley Scott’s brother Tony, came in,

 

the concept looked even worse. The mindless managers marching off the cliff were singing a funeral-paced

version of the Snow White song “Heigh-ho, Heigh-ho,” and the dreary filmmaking made it even more

depressing than the storyboards portended. “I can’t believe you’re going to insult businesspeople across

 

America by running that,” Debi Coleman yelled at Jobs when she saw the ad. At the marketing meetings

, she stood up to make her point about how much she hated it. “I literally put a resignation letter on his

desk. I wrote it on my Mac. I thought it was an affront to corporate managers.

We were just beginning to get a toehold with desktop publishing.”

 

Both Gassée and Negroponte tell tales of him pining over women while there.

Falling

After the burst of excitement that accompanied the release of Macintosh, its sales

began to taper off in the second half of 1984. The problem was a fundamental one:

It was a dazzling but woefully slow and underpowered computer, and no amount

of hoopla could mask that. Its beauty was that its user interface looked like a sunny

playroom rather than a somber dark screen with sickly green pulsating letters and surly

command lines. But that led to its greatest weakness: A character on a text-based display

took less than a byte of code, whereas when the Mac drew a letter, pixel by pixel in any

elegant font you wanted, it required twenty or thirty times more memory. The Lisa

handled this by shipping with more than 1,000K RAM, whereas the Macintosh made do with 128K.

Another problem was the lack of an internal hard disk drive. Jobs had called Joanna Hoffman

a “Xerox bigot” when she fought for such a storage device. He insisted that the Macintosh

have just one floppy disk drive. If you wanted to copy data, you could end up with a new

form of tennis elbow from having to swap floppy disks in and out of the single drive. In addition,

the Macintosh lacked a fan, another example of Jobs’s dogmatic stubbornness. Fans, he felt,

detracted from the calm of a computer. This caused many component failures and earned the

Macintosh the nickname “the beige toaster,” which did not enhance its popularity. It was so

seductive that it had sold well enough for the first few months, but when people became more

aware of its limitations,

 

sales fell. As

The reality distortion

field can serve as a spur,

but then reality itself hits.”

www.she419.com

The dark mood was evident in the ad that was developed

The dark mood was evident in the ad that was developed

The dark mood was evident in the ad that was developed in January 1985,

which was supposed to reprise the anti-IBM sentiment of the resonant “1984”

ad. Unfortunately there was a fundamental difference: The first ad had ended on

 

a heroic, optimistic note, but the storyboards presented by Lee Clow and Jay

Chiat for the new ad, titled “Lemmings,” showed dark-suited, blindfolded corporate

managers marching off a cliff to their death. From the beginning both Jobs and

 

Sculley were uneasy. It didn’t seem as if it would convey a positive or glorious image of

Apple, but instead would merely insult every manager who had bought an IBM.

 

It was on this trip that Jobs first got to know Jean-Louis Gassée, Apple’s manager in France.

Gassée was among the few to stand up successfully to Jobs on the trip. “He has his own

way with the truth,” Gassée later remarked. “The only way to deal with him was to out-bully him.”

When Jobs made his usual threat about cutting down on France’s allocations if Gassée didn’t

jack up sales projections, Gassée got angry. “I remember grabbing his lapel and telling him to

stop, and then he backed down. I used to be an angry man myself. I am a recovering assaholic.

So I could recognize that in Steve.”

In Italy, he took an instant dislike to Apple’s general manager, a soft rotund guy who had come

from a conventional business. Jobs told him bluntly that he was not impressed with his team

or his sales strategy. “You don’t deserve to be able to sell the Mac,” Jobs said coldly. But that

was mild compared to his reaction to the restaurant the hapless manager had chosen. Jobs

demanded a vegan meal, but the waiter very elaborately proceeded to dish out a sauce filled

with sour cream. Jobs got so nasty that Hoffman had to threaten him. She whispered that if he

didn’t calm down, she was going to pour her hot coffee on his lap.

The most substantive disagreements Jobs had on the European trip concerned sales forecasts.

Using his reality distortion field, Jobs was always pushing his team to come up with higher

projections. He kept threatening the European managers that he wouldn’t give them any

allocations unless they projected bigger forecasts. They insisted on being realistic, and

Hoffmann had to referee. “

 

By the end of the trip, my

whole body was

shaking uncontrollably,”

Hoffman recalled.

shd419.com

Afterward, as he sped his Mercedes down the freeway toward

Afterward, as he sped his Mercedes down the freeway toward

Afterward, as he sped his Mercedes down the freeway toward Cupertino, Jobs fumed to

Rossmann about Madame Mitterrand’s attitude. At one point he was going just over 100

miles per hour when a policeman stopped him and began writing a ticket. After a few minutes,

 

as the officer scribbled away, Jobs honked. “Excuse me?” the policeman said. Jobs replied,

“I’m in a hurry.” Amazingly, the officer didn’t get mad. He simply finished writing the ticket and

warned that if Jobs was caught going over 55 again he would be sent to jail. As soon as the

 

policeman left, Jobs got back on the road and accelerated to 100. “He absolutely believed

that the normal rules didn’t apply to him,” Rossmann marveled.

 

and its bright blue, yellow, and red machines, the factory floor “looked like an Alexander

Calder showcase,” said Coleman.

I’d go out to the factory, and I’d put on a white glove to check for du

st. I’d find it everywhere—on

machines, on the tops of the racks, on the floor. And I’d ask Debi to get it cleaned. I told her

I thought we should be able to eat off the floor of the factory. Well, this drove Debi up the wall.

She didn’t understand why. And I couldn’t articulate it back then. See, I’d been very influenced

by what I’d seen in Japan. Part of what I greatly admired there—and part of what we were lacking

in our factory—was a sense of teamwork and discipline. If we didn’t have the discipline to keep

that place spotless, then we weren’t going to have the discipline to keep all these machines running.

Things were not quite as sweet when Danielle Mitterrand toured the factory. The Cuba-admiring wife

of France’s socialist president Fran?ois Mitterrand asked a lot of questions, through her translator,

about the working conditions, while Jobs, who had grabbed Alain Rossmann to serve as his translator,

kept trying to explain the advanced robotics and technology. After Jobs talked about the just-in-time

production schedules, she asked about overtime pay. He was annoyed, so he described how automation

helped him keep down labor costs, a subject he knew would not delight her. “Is it hard work?” she asked.

“How much vacation time do they get?” Jobs couldn’t contain himself. “If she’s so interested in their welfare,”

he said to her translator, “tell her she can come work here any time.” The translator turned pale and said nothing.

After a moment Rossmann stepped in to say, in French, “M. Jobs says he thanks you for your visit and your

interest in the factory.” Neither Jobs nor Madame Mitterrand

 

knew what happened,

Rossmann recalled,

but her translator

looked very relieved.

www.shd419.com

One day the Emperor was riding toward the hunting

One day the Emperor was riding toward the hunting

One day the Emperor was riding toward the hunting grounds and noticed his newly found uncle respectfully standing by the roadside.

“I should like to see my uncle display his hunting skill,” said the Emperor.

  Liu Bei mounted his steed at once. Just then a hare started from its form. Liu Bei shot and hit it with the first arrow.

  the Emperor, much struck by this display, rode away over a slope. Suddenly a deer broke out of the thicket. He shot three arrows at it but all missed.

  “You try,” said the Emperor turning to Cao Cao.

  “Lend me Your Majesty’s bow,” Cao Cao replied.

  Taking the inlaid bow and the golden-tipped arrows, Cao Cao pulled the bow and hit the deer in the shoulder at the first shot. It fell in the grass and could not run.

  Now the crowd of officers seeing the golden-barbed arrow sticking in the wound concluded at once that the shot was the Emperor’s, so they rushed up and shouted “Wan shui! O King! Live forever!”

  Cao Cao rode out pushing past the Emperor and acknowledged the congratulations.

  they all turned pale. Guan Yu, who was behind Liu Bei, was especially angry. The silkworm eyebrows stood up fiercely, and the red phoenix eyes glared as, sword in hand, he rode hastily forth to cut down the audacious Prime Minister for his impertinence.

  However, Liu Bei hastily waved him back and shot at him a meaning glance so that Guan Yu stopped and made no further move.

  Liu Bei bowing toward Cao Cao said, “Most sincere felicitations! A truly supernatural shot, such as few have achieved!”

“It is only the enormous good fortune of the Son of Heaven!” said Cao Cao with a smile.

then he turned his steed and felicitated the Emperor. But he did not return the bow; he hung it over his own shoulder instead.

the hunt finished with banqueting;

and when the entertainments were over,

they returned to the capital,

all glad of some repose after the expedition.

ashchc.com

Cheng Yu advised Cao Cao to assume a more definite

Cheng Yu advised Cao Cao to assume a more definite

Cheng Yu advised Cao Cao to assume a more definite position. He said, “Illustrious Sir, your prestige grows daily. Why not seize the opportunity to take the position of Chief of the Feudatory Princes?”

“there are still too many supporters of the court,” was the reply. “I must be careful. I am going to propose a royal hunt to try to find out the best line to follow.”

  This expedition being decided upon they got together fleet horses, famous falcons, and pediGREe hounds, and prepared bows and arrows in readiness. They mustered a strong force of guards outside the city.

  When the Prime Minister proposed the hunting expedition, the Emperor said he feared it was an improper thing to do.

  Cao Cao replied, “In ancient times rulers made four expeditions yearly at each of the four seasons in order to show their strength. They were called Sou, Miao, Xien, and Shou, in the order of spring, summer, autumn, and winter. Now that the whole country is in confusion, it would be wise to inaugurate a hunt in order to train the army. I am sure Your Majesty will approve.”

  So the Emperor with the full paraphernalia for an imperial hunt joined the expedition. He rode a saddled horse, carried an inlaid bow, and his quiver was filled with gold-tipped arrows. His chariot followed behind. Liu Bei and his brothers were in the imperial train, each with his bow and quiver. Each party member wore a breastplate under the outer robe and held his especial weapon, while their escort followed them. Cao Cao rode a dun horse called “Flying-Lightning,” and the army was one hundred thousand strong.

  the hunt took place in Xutian, and the legions spread out as guards round the hunting arena which extended over some one hundred square miles.

Cao Cao rode even with the Emperor, the horses’ heads alternating in the lead.

The imperial attendants immediately following were all in Cao Cao’s confidence.

The other officers, civil and military,

lagged behind, for they dared not press forward into the midst of Cao Cao’s partisans.

www.qianpdd.com

“When you throw stones at a rat, beware of the vase

“When you throw stones at a rat, beware of the vase

Guan Yu was still angry of the Prime Minister’s breach of decorum.

One day Guan Yu said to Liu Bei, “Brother, why did you prevent me from killing that rebel and so ridding the world of a scoundrel? He insults the Emperor and ignores everybody else.”

  “When you throw stones at a rat, beware of the vase,” quoted Liu Bei. “Cao Cao was only a horse’s head away from Our Lord, and in the midst of a crowd of his partisans. In that momentary burst of anger, if you had struck and failed, and harm had come to the Emperor, what an awful crime would have been laid to us!”

  “If we do not rid the world of him today, a worse evil will come of it,” said Guan Yu.

  “But be discreet, my brother. Such matters cannot be lightly discussed.”

  the Emperor sadly returned to his palace. With tears in his eyes, he related what had occurred in the hunt to his consort, Empress Fu.

  “Alas for me!” said he. “From the first days of my accession, one vicious minister has succeeded another. I was the victim of Dong Zhuo’s evil machinations. Then followed the rebellion of Li Jue and Guo Si. You and I had to bear sorrows such as no others have borne. Then came this Cao Cao as one who would maintain the imperial dignity, but he has seized upon all real authority and does as he wishes. He works continually for his own glorification, and I never see him but my back pricks. These last few days in the hunting field, he went in front of me and acknowledged the cheers of the crowd. He is so extremely rude that I feel sure he has sinister designs against me. Alas, my wife, we know not when our end may come!”

  “In a whole court full of nobles, who have eaten the bread of Han, is there not one who will save his country?” said she.

  Thus spoke the Empress, and at the same moment there stepped in a man who said, “Grieve not, O Imperial Pair! I can find a savior for the country.”

It was none other than the father of the Empress, Fu Wan.

“Have you heard of Cao Cao’s

wanton and perverse behavior?”

said the Emperor, drying his eyes.

www.ashchc.com

The lights dimmed as Jobs reappeared onstage and launched into

The lights dimmed as Jobs reappeared onstage and launched into

The lights dimmed as Jobs reappeared onstage and launched into a dramatic version

of the battle cry he had delivered at the Hawaii sales conference. “It is 1958,” he began.

“IBM passes up a chance to buy a young fledgling company that has invented a new

 

technology called xerography. Two years later, Xerox was born, and IBM has been kicking

themselves ever since.” The crowd laughed. Hertzfeld had heard versions of the speech

both in Hawaii and elsewhere, but he was struck by how this time it was pulsing with more

passion. After recounting other IBM missteps, Jobs picked up the pace and

the emotion as he built toward the present:

It is now 1984. It appears that IBM wants it all. Apple is perceived to be the only hope to offer

IBM a run for its money. Dealers, after initially welcoming IBM with open arms, now fear an

IBM-dominated and-controlled future and are turning back to Apple as the only force who

can ensure their future freedom. IBM wants it all, and is aiming its guns at its last obstacle to

industry control, Apple. Will Big Blue dominate the entire computer industry? The entire

information age? Was George Orwell right?

As he built to the climax, the audience went from murmuring to applauding to a frenzy of cheering

and chanting. But before they could answer the Orwell question, the auditorium went black and

the “1984” commercial appeared on the screen. When it was over, the entire audience was on its feet cheering.

With a flair for the dramatic, Jobs walked across the dark stage to a small table with a cloth bag on it.

“Now I’d like to show you Macintosh in person,” he said. He took out the computer, keyboard, and mouse,

hooked them together deftly, then pulled one of the new 3?-inch floppies from his shirt pocket.

The theme from Chariots of Fire began to play. Jobs held his breath for a moment, because the demo

had not worked well the night before. But this time it ran flawlessly. The word “MACINTOSH” scrolled

horizontally onscreen, then underneath it the words “Insanely great” appeared in script, as if being slowly

written by hand. Not used to such beautiful graphic displays, the audience quieted for a moment.

A few gasps could be heard. And then, in rapid succession, came a series of screen shots: Bill Atkinson’s

QuickDraw graphics package followed by displays of different fonts, documents, charts, drawings, a chess game,

 

a spreadsheet, and a

rendering of Steve Jobs

with a thought bubble

containing a Macintosh.

shb419.com

Keeping Jobs happy and deferring to his expertise may have

Keeping Jobs happy and deferring to his expertise may have

Keeping Jobs happy and deferring to his expertise may have seemed like a smart strategy to Sculley.

But he failed to realize that it was not in Jobs’s nature to share control. Deference did not come naturally

to him. He began to become more vocal about how he thought the company should be run. At the 1984

 

business strategy meeting, for example, he pushed to make the company’s centralized sales and marketing

staffs bid on the right to provide their services to the various product divisions. (This would have meant,

 

for example, that the Macintosh group could decide not to use Apple’s marketing team and instead create

one of its own.) No one else was in favor, but Jobs kept trying to ram it through. “People were looking

to me to take control, to get him to sit down and shut up, but I didn’t,” Sculley recalled. As the meeting

broke up, he heard someone whisper, “Why doesn’t Sculley shut him up?”

 

As chairman of the company, Jobs went onstage first to start the shareholders’ meeting. He

did so with his own form of an invocation. “I’d like to open the meeting,” he said, “with a

twenty-year-old poem by Dylan—that’s Bob Dylan.” He broke into a little smile, then looked

down to read from the second verse of “The Times They Are a-Changin’.” His voice was high-pitched

as he raced through the ten lines, ending with “For the loser now / Will be later to win /

For the times they are a-changin’.” That song was the anthem that kept the multimillionaire board

chairman in touch with his counterculture self-image. He had a bootleg copy of his favorite version,

which was from the live concert Dylan performed, with Joan Baez, on Halloween 1964

at Lincoln Center’s Philharmonic Hall.

Sculley came onstage to report on the company’s earnings, and the audience started to become restless

as he droned on. Finally, he ended with a personal note. “The most important thing that has happened

to me in the last nine months at Apple has been a chance to develop a friendship with

 

Steve Jobs,” he said.

“For me, the rapport

we have developed

means an awful lot.”

www.shb419.com

The technology writer Steven Levy, who was then working for

The technology writer Steven Levy, who was then working for

The technology writer Steven Levy, who was then working for Rolling Stone, came to

interview Jobs, who urged him to convince the magazine’s publisher to put the Macintosh

team on the cover of the magazine. “The chances of Jann Wenner agreeing to displace Sting in

 

favor of a bunch of computer nerds were approximately one in a googolplex,” Levy thought,

correctly. Jobs took Levy to a pizza joint and pressed the case: Rolling Stone was “on the ropes,

running crummy articles, looking desperately for new topics and new audiences. The Mac could

be its salvation!” Levy pushed back. Rolling Stone was actually good, he said, and he asked Jobs

if he had read it recently. Jobs said that he had, an article about MTV that was “a piece of shit.”

Levy replied that he had written that article. Jobs, to his credit, didn’t back away from the assessment.

Instead he turned philosophical as he talked about the Macintosh. We are constantly benefiting from

advances that went before us and taking things that people before us developed, he said. “It’s a

wonderful, ecstatic feeling to create something that puts it back in the pool

of human experience and knowledge.”

Levy’s story didn’t make it to the cover. But in the future, every major product launch that Jobs was involved

in—at NeXT, at Pixar, and years later when he returned to Apple—would end

up on the cover of either Time, Newsweek, or Business Week.

January 24, 1984

Most of all, Jobs fretted about his presentation. Sculley fancied himself a good writer,

so he suggested changes in Jobs’s script. Jobs recalled being slightly annoyed, but their

relationship was still in the phase when he was lathering on flattery and stroking Sculley’s ego.

“I think of you just like Woz and Markkula,” he told Sculley. “You’re like one of the founders

of the company.

 

They founded the company,

but you and I are

founding the future.”

Sculley lapped it up.

sha419.com

Jobs had asked Hertzfeld and the gang to prepare a special screen

Jobs had asked Hertzfeld and the gang to prepare a special screen display for Sculley’s amusement.

“He’s really smart,” Jobs said. “You wouldn’t believe how smart he is.” The explanation that

Sculley might buy a lot of Macintoshes for Pepsi “sounded a little bit fishy to me,” Hertzfeld recalled,

 

but he and Susan Kare created a screen of Pepsi caps and cans that danced around with the Apple

logo. Hertzfeld was so excited he began waving his arms around during the demo, but Sculley seemed

underwhelmed. “He asked a few questions, but he didn’t seem all that interested,” Hertzfeld recalled.

 

He never ended up warming to Sculley. “He was incredibly phony, a complete poseur,” he later said.

“He pretended to be interested in technology, but he wasn’t. He was a marketing guy, and that is

what marketing guys are: paid poseurs.”

Matters came to a head when Jobs visited New York in March 1983 and was able to convert the

courtship into a blind and blinding romance. “I really think you’re the guy,” Jobs said as they walked

through Central Park. “I want you to come and work with me. I can learn so much from you.” Jobs,

who had cultivated father figures in the past, knew just how to play to Sculley’s ego and insecurities.

It worked. “I was smitten by him,” Sculley later admitted. “Steve was one of the brightest people

I’d ever met. I shared with him a passion for ideas.”

Sculley, who was interested in art history, steered them toward the Metropolitan Museum for a little

test of whether Jobs was really willing to learn from others. “I wanted to see how well he could take

coaching in a subject where he had no background,” he recalled. As they strolled through the Greek

and Roman antiquities, Sculley expounded on the difference between the Archaic sculpture of the sixth

century B.C. and the Periclean sculptures a century later. Jobs, who loved to pick up historical nuggets

he never learned in college, seemed to soak it in. “I gained a sense that I could be a teacher to a

brilliant student,” Sculley recalled. Once again he indulged the conceit that they were alike: “I saw

in him a mirror image of my younger self. I, too, was impatient, stubborn, arrogant, impetuous.

My mind exploded with ideas, often to the

 

exclusion of everything else.

I, too, was intolerant of

those who couldn’t live

up to my demands.”

shc419.com